Oregon Magazine
   Cover


 

Pigskin Pete:    

Welcome, Ducks to U.S. College Football Elite  By Fred Delkin

         Earn the right to compete for the national NCAA Division I national title, and your college gains the full attention of the rules enforcement authorities...just ask Southern California and Ohio State for confirmation of this fact.  Those two grid powers now operate under severe restrictions imposed by the rules crafters.  Now, a very press-worthy investigation has been mounted on the University of Oregon as the 2012 season is on the horizon.  The equation for reaching this status is quite simple: it takes high caliber playing talent and greedy coaches and alumni chasing same to get this far.  Remember the ugly recruiting allegations leveled at Auburn, the Ducks' foe for the 2010 national crown?  And what about the NCAA bashing that destroyed a University of Washington program that had achieved Pac10 dominance?
ooo 

        Auburn seems to have walked, and we believe the Webfoots will, as well.  The Ducks are producing a lofty pile of paperwork that documents their innocence.  UO coach Chip Kelly has found that the jump from an assistant mentor at the University of New Hampshire to his current position is, indeed, a helluva leap.  When you become a recruiting magnate for nationally- celebrated high school players, you're bound to get some immature, swellheaded athletes in your midst.  Kelly has reacted well so far to this situation, disciplining or outright dropping star athletes for their peccadilloes.
ooo 

        Kelly's innovative coaching and an experienced talent pool will again vie for national honors at 2011 season's end, despite the juvenile nonsense of a suspended star defensive back.  We testify that any major bowl-eligible program basks in a media spotlight that attracts enforcement attention just as bees to honey.  Money is what big bowl status is all about, even if the college presidents deny their institutions' chasing after it.
ooo 

        Guess what...it was that way back in the '50's when we played, and the television media's slavering for ever more sustenance has only accelerated the dash for dollars.  Major college football is very big business, a symbol of capitalism run rampant.  Its audience will always be fascinated and its administrative participants must constantly guard against the sins it fosters.
ooo 

© 2011 Oregon Magazine